Motivated Performance
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Motivational Maps FAQ

Frequently Asked Questions

Check out our most frequently asked questions, or head over to our contact page for any other ways that we can help you!

That depends upon you, the Practitioner. Practitioners who want to make a difference to business performance will discuss performance as well as motivation. This is not a one-way ‘you said – we did’ conversation; it’s a grown-up conversation about what the organisations needs from an individual, what they need from the organisation and how you can work together to make that happen.


Therefore, it transforms the role of HR Professionals from reactive fixers to strategic influencers and coaches. Of course, there are skills involved in influencing and coaching and Motivational Maps will give you the data, insights and confidence to develop them.

For someone who’s never done profiles before, I’ll often do a personality profile.  It provides that initial overview, a way to ‘see’ themselves and their behaviour through others’ eyes.

We can build on this picture with the motivators, to reveal values and beliefs – and also question the motives behind overplayed colours, e.g. Red.

 

For someone who’s done personality profiles before, or if there’s only budget/ appetite for one profile, I’ll use Motivational Maps.  They enable the client and I to make sense of their feelings, to get straight to the heart of the matter.  They love the non-judgemental coaching conversation, and it builds trust really quickly. That enables us to quickly identify several areas for coaching, e.g. increasing motivation, areas of disengagement, and the motivators reflect their values and beliefs which are great coaching areas too – especially when these are misaligned with their role or goal.

 

Maps are also really effective as ‘speed dating’ within teams, describing what motivates themselves to their colleagues and how that influences their work.

 

Unlike personality profiles, Maps can be repeated regularly. Normally, not more than once a year, unless the person is going through a big change – e.g. from interview candidate to 3 month probationary period, etc.

And the Team and Organisational Maps build up a picture of the dynamics inside the team, as well as identifying ideal reward strategies.

The biggest headache for managers is nearly always their people. People aren’t robots and their needs and moods change. Understanding these needs and changing moods has been a problem for managers forever, and significantly more so in the fast-changing environment we work in today.

If you want high-performing motivated teams, best-selling author Gary Vaynerchuk recommends taking each employee out for a meal and spending 1.5 hours discussing what they need from their work. Whilst laudable, this approach is flawed because it relies on each individual consciously being aware of their emotional needs, how to satisfy them and, crucially, being comfortable saying that to the boss.

Motivational Maps, on the other hand, takes a very different approach. Users feel far more comfortable completing a 15-minute questionnaire and seeing the results for themselves. Informed with this information, they are well equipped for an engaging open discussion about what they want from their work, what’s working well and what’s not. The profile also provides insights into team dynamics and career preferences – and for not much more than Gary V’s recommended meal.

Doesn't this information on employees' needs already exist?
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faq expand
Is it all about increasing motivation - or performance too?
faq expand
faq expand
Should Motivational Maps be used over personality profiles?
faq expand
faq expand

About Motivational Maps

That depends upon you, the Practitioner. Practitioners who want to make a difference to business performance will discuss performance as well as motivation. This is not a one-way ‘you said – we did’ conversation; it’s a grown-up conversation about what the organisations needs from an individual, what they need from the organisation and how you can work together to make that happen.


Therefore, it transforms the role of HR Professionals from reactive fixers to strategic influencers and coaches. Of course, there are skills involved in influencing and coaching and Motivational Maps will give you the data, insights and confidence to develop them.

For someone who’s never done profiles before, I’ll often do a personality profile.  It provides that initial overview, a way to ‘see’ themselves and their behaviour through others’ eyes. We can build on this picture with the motivators, to reveal values and beliefs – and also question the motives behind overplayed colours, e.g. Red.

 

For someone who’s done personality profiles before, or if there’s only budget/ appetite for one profile, I’ll use Motivational Maps.  They enable the client and I to make sense of their feelings, to get straight to the heart of the matter.  They love the non-judgemental coaching conversation, and it builds trust really quickly. That enables us to quickly identify several areas for coaching, e.g. increasing motivation, areas of disengagement, and the motivators reflect their values and beliefs which are great coaching areas too – especially when these are misaligned with their role or goal.

 

Maps are also really effective as ‘speed dating’ within teams, describing what motivates themselves to their colleagues and how that influences their work.

 

Unlike personality profiles, Maps can be repeated regularly. Normally, not more than once a year, unless the person is going through a big change – e.g. from interview candidate to 3 month probationary period, etc.

And the Team and Organisational Maps build up a picture of the dynamics inside the team, as well as identifying ideal reward strategies.

The biggest headache for managers is nearly always their people. People aren’t robots and their needs and moods change. Understanding these needs and changing moods has been a problem for managers forever, and significantly more so in the fast-changing environment we work in today.

If you want high-performing motivated teams, best-selling author Gary Vaynerchuk recommends taking each employee out for a meal and spending 1.5 hours discussing what they need from their work. Whilst laudable, this approach is flawed because it relies on each individual consciously being aware of their emotional needs, how to satisfy them and, crucially, being comfortable saying that to the boss.

Motivational Maps, on the other hand, takes a very different approach. Users feel far more comfortable completing a 15-minute questionnaire and seeing the results for themselves. Informed with this information, they are well equipped for an engaging open discussion about what they want from their work, what’s working well and what’s not. The profile also provides insights into team dynamics and career preferences – and for not much more than Gary V’s recommended meal.

Doesn't this information on employees' needs already exist?
faq expand
faq expand
Is it all about increasing motivation - or performance too?
faq expand
faq expand
Should Motivational Maps be used over personality profiles?
faq expand
faq expand

About Motivated Performance

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